Saturday, March 21, 2009

Big Bang's Hole-y Bladder

Surely the only way to judge Big Bang, or indeed any beginning theory, is to start at the beginning; and that is, a singularity suddenly blowing apart.

Science claims that the singularity was a previous universe that had collapsed under it's collective gravity and reached that tiny infintisimal size of something smaller than an atom. But the underlying question is:- Why did there have to be a beginning? I suppose that if an exageration is huge and absurd enough it is too large to question. The trouble with that is that it must crash under those excesses.

Let's deal with some simple facts of Bang, Expansion, and construction of the universe and how it appears today from a Big Bang beginning.

Expansion is said to be still occurring.

It is claimed that there is a boundary between the universe's space and a beyond of 'no-space'. The boundary or bladder is about thirteen point seven billion light-years away from us – I understand that is in all directions, which must place us in the middle of the universe. Really, that is very hard to believe.

Also claimed is that we have the youngest and most distant galaxies in the universe thirteen billion light years away, just seven hundred million light years short of the bladder – and this is where the accepted structure goes horribly wrong.

Stars shine globally. (Please, before you read on, agree or disagree with that statement)????
Around thirteen billion light years is the time taken for those most distant galaxies light to spread globally, or in other words, in every direction. Therefore, the distance they are from us will surely be repeated the same distance billions of light years beyond the boundary set by Science. Why would that not be so?

Light energy is subatomic particles that 'conservation' would insist must not be lost to the contained universe.

Besides that it is claimed by Science that these same galaxies are the youngest in the universe, and that they are still there. Since we see them as they were thirteen billion years ago in an expanding universe how can they still be there? If they are traveling away from us at or near the speed of light then they are at least twice the distance away now, so, as for the bladder boundary, it's either gone on ahead or has been torn to shreds. But more importantly, the universe will be ever so much older and larger than claimed.

Therefore, I repeat the simple question:- Why did there have to be a beginning? The universe is a complete recycling system. To agree with that fundamental concept is to accept that it has always been, and stars, planets, bits of rock, your own remains and the light you shine from your torch, will recycle and recycle eternally.

And what you see in the universe was there. - Even the sun is eight minutes ahead of where it appears to be. And, if Alpha Proxima, our nearest star neighbor, blew up three and a half years ago, we would see it as being perfectly OK right now and for another six months yet, then we would see the fireworks.